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  • May 2021
  • Autonomous Ships
    Cars that drive themselves have been around for years. So it is a no brainer that boats would one day be driving themselves. In fact, they have been doing short trip across rivers and bays for quite a while. Unmanned underwater exploration vessels have been…
  • The Sharks Below Our Hulls and Feet!
    No, I don’t wanna’ be Quint and this is not about “JAWS”, It’s just an informative guide that answers the question that sunny day boaters and their guests often ask. Are there any sharks here? Knowing the person’s personality is my guide to gauge my…
  • The Boat I Didn’t Buy
    The old Huckins in the back of the used car lot had seen better days. Where repairs had been made they seemed to have been made by a person who had never been on a boat before. I did not expect a $4,500 boat that…
  • The Sea Islands of South Carolina
    My beautiful home state of South Carolina boasts 187 miles of Atlantic coastline renowned as the Lowcountry and Just off our sand beaches lays one of its most striking features, the Sea Islands; an extended string of twenty-five barrier islands that transform constantly with the…
  • Taking Exit One off the LI Sound
    Captains and families on the Long Island Sound do not have to go far for a fun weekend on their boat. Long Island’s north shore has six “exits” off the Long Island Sound that are worth a visit. These include three bays, two harbors and…
  • Admiral David G. Farragut – A Naval Hero Serving Our Country for Sixty Years
    David Glasgow Farragut, born July 5, 1801, is an important American hero who devoted his life to service in the United States Navy. He holds the distinction of the first man to be awarded the titles of rear admiral, vice admiral and full admiral of…
  • Skipper’s Corner – Learning the Ropes
    What type and size is best for your boat?The ropes you use while boating are never, ever called “Ropes”. They are always called “Lines”! Rope is the term for what is used to make boats lines but finished product is always called a “LINE” Your…
  • Sitting On the Dock of the Bay
    This is a little “out of area” and comes from a time I lived near the canal but it just might temp you to take a trip down to the C&D Canal, linking the Delaware Bay with the Chesapeake BayI find that three of the…
  • Sentinels and Saviors of the Sea – the Capture of the Revenue Cutter Caleb Cushing
    Each month, an interesting aspect of the world’s oldest continuous maritime service will be highlighted. The men and women of the United States Coast Guard follow in the fine tradition of the brave mariners who have served before them. As sentinels and saviors of the…
  • Seamanship – Hello? Hello? Can You Hear Me Now? – Cell Phones and Boats
    When I have written in the past about the need and use of a VHF radio, I noted that if you didn’t have a radio aboard that you were risking your life over a couple of hundred dollars – it was “nutty” not to have…
  • Advanced Navgation Rules – Part II
    Advanced Nav Rules, Part 2 of 3 … Inland and International Navigation Rules …The current Inland Navigation Rules were established in the1980’s. These were defined by the 1982 United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea. Inland Navigation Rules apply to waters that are…
  • Legal Perspective -Insurance Carrier Closely Examines Sinking at Dock
    The sinking of a boat can be an emotional and stressful event for an owner. But in the grand scheme of things within the recreational marine industry, it’s something that happens regularly… at a slip, at a mooring, or in a quiet patch of marshland…
  • On Living Aboard
    Although the boatyard is busy, we have managed to still remain isolated due to the COVID virus. We haven’t been inoculated as of yet. We’re not eligible because of our ages. That means whenever we venture off the boat, we are sure to be wearing…
  • The Sailaway Gourmet
    I am so thrilled to be back out on the water. I love the smells of the harbor, the way the air feels and being around so many happy people who enjoy getting out on a boat as much as I do. Let’s all have…
  • Celestial Navigation to GPS
    Even when boating close to shore, it can be difficult to relocate a favorite fishing or Scuba diving site, without a nearby marking buoy or some other point of orientation. Luckily, GPS and a good depth sounder has made it relatively easy to return to…
  • LI Fishing Report
    Freshwater fishing remained strong with yellow perch, bass, and pickerel. Pickerel reopened on May 1st. We also started to see more reports of trout becoming available as restocking programs are well underway. The main targets continue to be trout (brown and rainbow), white perch, and…
  • Pirate Soul
    It’s a rather interesting phenomenon that most of us think of pirates as romantic heroes, despite the fact they were common street criminals roaming the open seas. I have over a dozen coveted books about pirates and some of my favorite movies are the old…
  • CT Fishing Report
    This time of year nearly every species is on the move and feeding ravenously as they continue on their spring and summer migrations to feeding grounds in this region. To me, May is the beginning of the marine fishing season as warming waters on all…
  • NJ Fishing Report
    As Covid restrictions are being lifted by the week, it seems we are on track for a solid summer of fishing, and there‘s no finer kickoff than Memorial Day weekend in May to get it started. But before the holiday weekend, there’s plenty of prime…
  • April 2021
  • “Wrecking” On the Beaches
    For a century and a half, wreckers worked with impunity along Long Island’s South Shore beaches from Coney Island to Montauk Point. Men like Talmadge Smith and Thomas Jones lured ships onto the sand bars at night or found other vessels that ran aground and…
  • Tales From the Silent Service – My Story
    I’ve had a lifelong love for the United States Navy and the “The Silent Service” in particular, and serving there has been my proudest accomplishment. My patriotism for America is rooted in my childhood when mom would bring me to watch the parades on the…
  • Splashing Your Boat 2021
    Man, I’m soooo glad Spring 2021 is here, because 2020 was one helluva year. Without beating things to death, it will sure be nice to actually do any chores relating to boating (or honey-dos so you can do the chores related to boating) and get…
  • Women Boat Buyers
    Some in the marine industry were not surprised at the pent up demand for boats resulting from the pandemic lockdowns in many parts of the country in 2020. What seemed harder to grasp was the proportion of women in the surge toward boat ownership. Women…
  • A Striper: The Prized Catch
    By early April, autumn-bared trees have already begun to spread a new canopy along the banks of the Hudson River. As its waters warm to about 58 to 60 F, striped bass make their way upstream to spawn in the river’s freshwater. Stripers, rockfish, greenhead…
  • Consider the Crab
    I can unequivocally state that my favorite seafood, by far, is blue crab. I’ve always thought it quite logical that it required so much time and effort to extract the delicacy recessed inside such a formidable, almost alien-looking body. It looks more like some rare…
  • A Treasure Just Off the Island of Manhattan
    In the midst of skyscrapers reaching toward the clouds, people dodging each other on crowded sidewalks, wall-to-wall traffic and packed subways, the 172-acre island, a half-mile from the tip of Manhattan, provides visitors with peace and tranquility from a busy city. Standing at the mouth…
  • Adding Cleats
    I didn’t realize how inadequate the cleats were on our 20-footer until I started keeping it at a dock and also anchoring out more. Actually the only cleat, other than the ones for the jib sheets, was a tiny little thing on the fore deck.…
  • The Sailaway Goumet
    Thankfully, winter is over and it’s time to get outside. And after hibernating, it’s nice to get some fresh air. Hopefully some of you were able to enjoy skiing or other winter sports that may have been available with Covid restrictions. Now that’s it’s April,…
  • Seamanship – The Good Samaritan – Safety of Life at Sea
    Any school child knows, or at least believes, that if you see a person or boat in distress on the water, the “law of the sea” demands that you render assistance. Simple human decency would require no less and, from time immemorial, this has been…
  • In Our Waters – The Lethal Patrol of the U-117
    The S.S. Mirlo trudged slowly through the calm waters off of North Carolina on her northbound course. With her tanks full of refined oil and gasoline, the British flagged tanker had set out from New Orleans, Louisiana six days earlier. Bound for New York and…
  • Skipper’s Corner – So You’re Looking for Dock Space?
    As I write, winter is in full retreat. Today will top out at 70 degrees and it’s not even mid-March. Boat covers are already coming off and boatyards are active. You just bought your first boat or you’re looking for a different dock this year…
  • On Living Aboard
    We’re still sitting here under house arrest, due to the pandemic, although the outlook is getting better, so we’re told.The Blonde, my wife is still working from ‘home’ or in this case, Patty O’, our forty two foot Huckins sedan cruser. Her work load has…
  • Legal Perspective – A Sailboat Collision off Alcatraz Tests Elements of Maritime Salvage Law
    The waters off Alcatraz can be both foreboding and alluring at the same time. Although far enough away from the great white sharks that for the most part prefer the other side of the Golden Gate, the area is respected by mariners because of the…
  • CT Fishing Report
    Every time we have a slow day on the water, maybe even take a sniff of the skunk’s hind end; it’s never our fault for choosing the wrong spot, poor lure choice or some other factor. Simply blame it on the weather. True to a…
  • NJ Fishing Report
    Last April we were in full lockdown with Covid and fishing opportunities were slim to say the least as marinas, public accesses and party boats were suspended. Those in the know were able to sneak around and find some accessible out of the way spots…
  • LI Fishing Report
    The weather has started to warm up and we started to finally see the winter’s snowmelt. Water temps are starting to warm up as the days are getting longer and spring is around the corner. Lakes and shallow ponds have started to see the ice…
  • March 2021
  • The Jewish Pirates
    History often plays with the past and facts are often distorted or full of omissions. The many histories, novels, and movies, written about pirates, makes one think the largest group of pirates were English, French and Dutch with North African Moorish, Turkish and Chinese thrown…
  • A Trailerable Houseboat
    At first glance, the Caraboat looks familiar but then again it is like nothing I have seen before. Basically, it is a luxury camper trailer or what the Europeans call a Caravan that also can be used as a boat. The concept of a houseboat…
  • Skipper’s Corner
    What is one of the most important things to do to stay safe on your boat. The answer is to pay attention to what you are wearing or not wearing on your feet. It so happens that one of the most common cause of boating…
  • Sentinels and Saviors of the Sea
    Each month, an interesting aspect of the world’s oldest continuous maritime service will be highlighted. The men and women of the United States Coast Guard follow in the fine tradition of the brave mariners who have served before them. As sentinels and saviors of the…
  • On Living Aboard
    We’ve been isolated aboard ever since the Corona virus took over the country. The Blonde, my wife works from home, i.e. the boat, albeit far less then pre-epidemic. It’s relatively easy to keep out of the mainstream living on a boat full time as we…
  • NJ Fishing Report
    Will March allow us more freedom from Covid? Tough to say as of February, but we can wish that it will get better month by month as we move into springtime. March is a month of excitement, mainly because it’s truly the first days of…
  • CT Fishing Report
    You know you are racking up the fishing seasons, which sadly seem to pass at an ever increasing rate every year as one ages, which only means time flies when you are having fun, especially with a fishing rod in hand. Constant action helps push…
  • Legal Perspective – What Is A Maritime Lien?
    Most people are familiar with the concept of liens in one way or another. If a contractor performs work for a homeowner and doesn’t get paid, they might assert a mechanic’s lien against the home. If a doctor provides a patient with treatment involving an…
  • LI Fishing Report
    Before you know it we will be tearing off the shrink-wrap on the boat and scheduling launch dates. Now is the time to not only get your boat ready but a great time to take care of your tackle. Don’t wait until the last minute!…
  • The Sailaway Gourmet
    Who knew we’d still be wearing masks and having to avoid each other. Hopefully everyone who has had to spend more time at home and less in person time has made use of Skype, Zoom, FaceTime and all those other modes of seeing and speaking…
  • Rescue, Recovery and Re-Warm – The Maritime 3 R’s
    When we were kids, it was all about readin’, ritin’ and ‘rithmatic. On the sea, especially in cold water environments, it is all about rescue, recovery and re-warming. I don’t expect that there are many boaters out there on our bays, creeks and littoral areas…
  • Tales from the Silent Service – Nuclear Submarine Main Ballast Blow and Trim Systems
    Most of the public have seen TV and movie scenes of a submarine being dived but aren’t privy to the actual mechanics and procedures of how it’s done. Typically, all we are shown is a camera-shot of the Captain ordering the dive of the boat…
  • Lines Led Aft
    Ternabout, my 20-foot sloop, had halyards that were wire-to-rope and original to the boat. After 20+ years of use, they were stiff as boards. The rope section was 5/16” line and the wire around 1/16”. I looked around for replacements but couldn’t find any stock…
  • Get Out, Screw Up, Try Again, Be Careful
    With pandemic times still about, new and used boat sales have been at record highs. This means for the upcoming 2021 boating season there will be a new crop of captains on the water. The reason for the high bump in sales is because on…
  • Water Bikes
    If you ask three people what water biking is, you could expect three different answers, including, “What’s that?” Water bikes have been around since the 1800s when they were called water velocipedes. More recently called amphibious cycles or hydrocycles, water bikes are propelled on land…
  • January – February 2021
  • A Sailor Named “Beamish”
    The name “Beamish” originated in the County Durham on coastal North West Britain (but the Irish claim it as their own). End of the summer, 1967, I was studying art at St. Johns University. I grew up in Rosedale with miles of wetlands, which we…
  • The Evolution of Modern Submarine Power Plants – Pt. II
    The term “nuclear” or “atomic” submarine generally denotes a submarine that is powered by nuclear propulsion generated by a reactor. The performance advantages of nuclear submarines over “conventional” diesel-electric submarines are considerable in that nuclear propulsion, being entirely independent of the necessity for combustion air…
  • Traghetto
    The gondola is synonymous with Venice and its ancient churches, great museums, grand palazzos, and intricate canals. It conjures up images of romantic couples nestled on the elaborately decorated couches in shinny black gondolas decorated with shimmering brass while echoes of singing gondoliers reverberate off…
  • The Belle of Southern Cruising: Savannah, GA
    One of the darling ports of calls when boating up and down the east coast is Savannah, GA. The city was founded in 1733 by the British as a buffer between the Spanish in Florida and the city Charleston to its north. It is distinctly…
  • Long Island Sound Hybrid Catamaran
    For the past year, First Harvest Navigation of Norwalk, Connecticut has been using its hybrid-powered vessel to transport supplies between its four-year-old Harbor Harvest food market in East Norwalk and a new one of the same name that it opened on the waterfront in Huntington…
  • The Greek Tragedy of the Tzenny Chandris
    Each month, an interesting aspect of the world’s oldest continuous maritime service will be highlighted. The men and women of the United States Coast Guard follow in the fine tradition of the brave mariners who have served before them. As sentinels and saviors of the…
  • Hooked on Fishing
    Working at jobs we see as rewarding and fulfilling never happens for some of us. We can go through several careers and jobs before some of us find the right path. The really lucky among us see their opportunities early on and focus on making…
  • Rhode Island’s Castle Hill Lighthouse
    Frank W. Parmele had served four years as Saybrook Breakwall Lighthouse’s head keeper until his reassignment to Castle Hill Light in March of 1890. Standing at the end of a breakwall, at the mouth of the Connecticut River, Saybrook was probably not a sought-after keeper…
  • Replacing a Trim-Tilt Unit on Your Outboard
    So. I lost pretty much (hah! … all of!) the past summer on my boat. Well, I got the bottom painted, and all was well until the end of June when a simple little “Oh, go take the grandkids out for a ride,” from the…
  • Emergency Pumps
    Last year I finished up a major project on my boat Keeper (Putting it all Together). Part of that project was removing the engines and among many other things removing the original seawater pumps and replacing them with a belt driven pump mounted in a…
  • CT Fishing Report
    What the heck is there to do during January? If Santa was listening, maybe you have a new rod and reel to rig up for the 2021 season. If the old gear is still in operational order, it is a good time to check guides…
  • On Living Aboard
    With our boat, Patty O’ safely ensconced on the beach and with my wife, the Blonde, happy with her ‘work from home’ (read boat) office intact, I began dealing with the dry-rot I’d found in Patty O’s transom. One of the biggest complaints I hear…
  • The Sailaway Gourmet
    Another new year and let’s hope that at some point it gets better than 2020 was. So much of what used to call ‘normal’ has changed and in many ways the world is a different place. Let us pray it’s all for the better and…
  • LI Fishing Report
    When the weather cooperates there has been plenty of action throughout Long island. The name of the game has been warmer than normal air and water temperatures coupled with an abundance of baitfish. Bunker and sand eels have been in the bays, inlets, and all…
  • Boating Safety Tips
    Marlinspike Seamanship … The Line on Lines … Marlinespike seamanship is a seasoned mariner’s skill that entails being able to proficiently work with all types of lines, ropes, and knots. The applications of this skill range from the handling of large lines on large ships,…
  • Boating Through the Ages – Pt. XI
    Now, although I have attempted to relegate sailing to it’s rightful place in boating – that being a thing of the past long since committed to the abyssal regions which we’d all like to forget – I hereby admit that there are two particular sailboats…
  • Legal Perspective
    The Three Wicked Sisters… that sounds like a good name for a nasty underwater rock formation. These three sisters actually involve a topic that students often see in the first year of law school. It refers to a trio of legal defenses commonly thrown at…
  • NJ Fishing Report
    Man, if 2020 was any barometer, 2021 is going to be a strange year, at least its going to start off like that. COVID concerns will no doubt dictate many facets of life throughout the winter and into early spring, but we can only pray…
  • Iceboating
    A long tradition of speed that can top over 100mph Here we are, sliding into winter. Most pleasure boats are being pulled and winterized. It was a real relief to be in boating this year with Covid 19 wreaking havoc. At least you were on…
  • Where Have All the Winter Flounders Gone?
    The winter flounder with its mild, slightly sweet white flesh, is frequently sought by recreational fishermen as a great food source. Easily prepared with its thin fillets and delicate flakes, it is recognized as a healthy source of dietary protein, B-vitamins and niacin. Recommended by…
  • USS Jamestown
    and America’s First Humanitarian Mission There has been a seething hatred between the Irish people and the British government for more years than anyone can remember. Undoubtedly, a major cause is what happened to the Irish people during the potato famine in the late 1840s…
  • The Dauntless “Veruna”
    For over two-hundred years the Mystic River in Connecticut was a center for New England’s shipbuilding industry. Many of the 1400 ships built there went on to have long successful careers. One ship that gained fame at the time and now is almost forgotten is…
  • Summer 2021 “Teach and Take a Kid” Free Sailing Program
    The wind was light from the east that lovely Sunday morning in September, sailing from Little Peconic Bay to deliver the newest member of our fleet, the 29-foot sloop Caprice back to the other end of Long Island in Brooklyn. This vessel would begin its…
  • Evolution of Modern Submarine Power Plants – Pt. I
    From the advent of submarine design, a crucial obstacle was the ability to provide life support for the crews and later-on combustion air for propulsion engines, hence, early submarines ran solely on batteries while submerged and so were considered to be electric boats. And although…
  • NJ Fishing Report
    You can leave all that comfy warm weather behind, because November and December bring some of the finest fishing in Jersey saltwater. Number one on the hit list is striped bass as the roving schools migrate southward and peak in Jersey waters throughout November then…
  • Going Lobstering
    My first serious boyfriend introduced me to a treat I never forgot. A diver, he sometimes came across lobsters in the ocean off Fire Island. His mother steamed the three he found at a wreck off Ocean Beach, provided lots of melted butter and showed…
  • The Evolution of USN Submarine Launched Weapons – Part II
    Unaware by the American public the much-publicized 1960s era space race was as much about developing ballistic missiles as it was putting a man on the moon. And more specifically achieving submarine launched ballistic missile (SLBM) capability because there was an equally crucial and secret…