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  • September 2021
  • The Mary E. And All That Jazz!
    As a lifetime Long Islander (YeahBud! Brooklyn and Queens are Long Island!) I’ve visited ports of call from Red Hook to Montauk and Orient. One of my old favorites was Greenport back when potato farmers drove tractors to town for breakfast at 6:30 AM. The…
  • USS Grayback
    One of the most successful submarines of World War II, the USS Grayback, fought its last battle at the end of February 1944, but was never seen again. Commissioned on June 30,1941 she set sail for Pearl Harbor after about six months to join the…
  • The Canal Boat Experience
    Have you ever thought about living on a boat? The canal boat life as experienced by the Brits on their narrowboats was the topic of a recent New York Times article. The English canal system started out as manmade connections between cities and towns on…
  • Lighthouse Artist, Bill Kuchler
    At age 74, Bill Kuchler figures he’ll run out of time before he runs out of lighthouses scenes to paint.Since retiring four years ago as an advertising creative director, the West Islip resident spends much of his time in the Blue Barn Studio, his name…
  • Beach, Culture, Food and Comfort on the Jersey Shore
    Last season’s “bring your boat to the beach” story spotlighted Fire Island. This season, the beach cruising gets better and easier on the New Jersey shore. Cruising to the BeachCruising to the northern New Jersey shore is a must-do for boaters in the region. It…
  • USCG Activities on City Island, NY during WWII
    BackgroundDuring World War II, the harbor defense and port security resources assigned to the protection of the New York Harbor region were significantly expanded due to the important strategic value of the port, as well as its associated shipping and terminals. This effort was undertaken…
  • In Our Waters – Iron Man Down
    The barge Nelson Bloom’s passing through the familiar waters of Thunder Bay, Lake Huron offered an almost silent and solemn homage to her long-lost sister ship whose remains lay dormant in the waters far below. Forty-seven years earlier, while plying the same waters, the Nelson…
  • Skipper’s Corner – When You Get Boarded!
    You are going to get boarded. It’s not a question of “if” but “when”. If you have a boat and use it, it’s inevitable. Be educated concerning the multiple government enforcement agencies that have the right to ask to board your vessel. The “asking” part…
  • Delaware’s Fire Control Towers
    In the early morning hours of February 27, 1942, the 7,451-ton tanker R.P. Resor was running parallel to the New Jersey shoreline, en route from Texas to Fall River, Massachusetts. Under the dim light of a quarter moon, the ship’s lookout spotted the running lights…
  • Legal Perspective – Duty To Cooperate With An Insurance Carrier
    It’s hard to turn on the TV these days and not see commercials for insurance. It’s a competitive industry, and to their credit, some of the carriers do a good job of producing funny ads. Whether the ads involve geckos, emus, or dysfunctional families, they…
  • New Horizons
    New boat, new operator, and new horizons. Despite all the rain and wind we have experienced this summer, my family and I have been able to use the boats fairly often. After getting the trailer put back in useable condition we took our Boston Whaler…
  • LI Fishing Report
    Weekend warriors had a tough go in August. It felt like every weekend had some questionable weather days. Wind and waves kept many anglers closer to home. However, there were plenty of mid week weather windows that allowed boaters to head out of Long Island’s…
  • Boating Safety Tips – Aids to Navigation
    Aids to Navigation … Do Yellow Buoys Mark Yellow Submarines ??? Not really … but yellow buoys do exist. They are a part of the U.S. Aids to Navigation system which covers Near Coastal and Inland waters. It does not include the Western Rivers nor…
  • Nautical Lyrics
    I’ve never been real big on poetry. I’ve tried reading it and even writing it, but I just don’t have the knack for it. Or, in some salty way, do I?I had a friend years ago that aspired to be a musician. Unlike many of…
  • The Sailaway Gourmet
    As always, summer has sped by and for many, sadly, it’s time to store the boats away for the long winter. This is not the case for avid fishermen, be it on their boats or casting off the shoreline. And clammers are still clamming.After some…
  • On Living Aboard
    When we modified Patty O’, our 42-foot Huckins sedan cruiser to be able to live aboard permanently, our plans were to travel up and down the east coast, following the nice weather. For reasons I won’t go into, that hasn’t happened yet. One of the…
  • NJ Fishing Report
    What a completely wild summer we’ve had so far! Strange tropical critters were all over Jersey waters in late July and August, the likes of which included Spanish mackerel, cobia, barracuda and sit down for this one – tarpon! Some bizarre cyclical phase is upon…
  • August 2021
  • Tales from the Silent Service – A Tale of Two Bluefish
    My service in the USN Submarine Service spanned 1969 to 1973. Upon my graduation from Basic Enlisted Submarine School at new London CT in December 1969 I had the distinct honor and privilege to be assigned to the Pre-commissioning crew of the Nuclear Attack submarine…
  • Sayville Yacht Clubs’ North American J-24 Regatta A Huge Success!
    There is no doubt the last year and a half has been a particularly trying time for everyone. Recently, however, there have been some bright spots in the water world of competitive sailing. With the easing of Covid this year, the Sayville Yacht Club proudly…
  • Newport: A Northeast Cruising Destination
    The nautical town of Newport, RI should be on every cruiser’s destination. Its protected harbor is located in Narragansett Sound, on the lower part of Aquidneck Island. Newport offers many things to do along with plenty of good restaurants. We recently spent two nights on…
  • If We Eat Like Fish, Will We Live Forever?
    Since I last spoke with Bren Smith for the 2016 Seaweed article, he has written a book, “Eat Like a Fish,” which reflects his trajectory from a Newfoundland high school dropout who became a lobsterman, then a commercial fisherman in Alaska, went back to school…
  • The River That Runs Through Us – “The Majestic Hudson”
    The Hudson River has been called “The Rhine” and ‘’Danube” of America. She is graced by cities, towns, castles, grand estates, mountains, farms, woodlands and marinas. It has been sailed on, fished, fought over, loved, polluted and redeemed by a humble folk singer who devoted…
  • Jean Lafitte, Patriot, Pirate, Privateer
    Mystery surrounds the life of Jean Lafitte. Lafitte always denied he was had committed the crimes of which he was accused. But he did admit to smuggling because of the unjust laws of the United States which forced him into it. Not much is known…
  • NJ Fishing Report
    Strangely enough, it seems that everything has been a little behind schedule for the first wave of summer in that water temps in early July were still hovering between 58 and 65 degrees on any given day. That gave a kind of slow start to…
  • And The Hits Keep Coming
    Last month I wrote about the failure of our boat trailer. With little use (less than 150 miles and never put into water) the left rear wheel bearing failed on the trailer. I had a hard time getting the wheel bearing off the axle spindle…
  • In Our Waters – Bound By The Barrel
    Jonathan H. Baldwin walked slowly over his own well-trodden path along the wooden deck of the Cunard Dock jutting out upon the waters of the Hudson River. His round now complete, he reflected upon the date as he sat down on his chair at the…
  • Legal Perspective – What Is An Open and Obvious Hazard?
    There are many popular videos out there that captivate the public’s fascination with abandoned places. For boaters, the videos that focus on ships probably hold particular interest. Now and then, I get asked by young people about poking abandoned vessels near their homes. And I…
  • Skipper’s Corner – The Book You Need – Before You Buy A Boat!
    Charles Fredric Chapman 1881-1976 was the famous editor of Motor Boating Magazine for over 56 years and was an avid boater himself. In 1916 the Assistant Secretary of the Navy, Franklin Roosevelt asked Chapman if he would create a manual for small boat handling. That…
  • New York Harbor’s Oyster Islands
    In its early history, the tidal waters of New York Harbor were host to large areas of oyster beds. They served as an important food source for Native Americans and early colonists. Their abundance eventually prompted Dutch colonists to name the harbor’s three tiny islands,…
  • Boating Safety Tips
    Carbon Monoxide (CO) – An Odorless, Colorless Predator … In most respects boating is a healthy outdoor activity that gives us opportunities to exercise and relax at the same time. During any given day on the water, boating enthusiasts go fishing, swimming, tubing, skiing, and…
  • The Sailaway Gourmet
    Summer is passing too quickly. And the weather has been crazy from the start, but I’m sure everyone is enjoying all the activities there are to do during the season. One of the favorites among my boaters in Mt. Sinai is fishing. There are the…
  • On Living Aboard
    Changing the oil on Patty O’, our 42 foot Huckins sedan cruiser’s twin Cummings diesel engines as well as the generator, is not performed on schedule. What we do is take a sample from each engine, which is sent to a testing lab, and the…
  • CT Fishing Report
    Many years ago, back in the late 60’s and early 70’s all anyone fished for and expected to catch on plugs and jigs were striped bass, bluefish, fluke, blackfish, and scup or porgies. Even great eating and hard pulling blackfish were nowhere near as popular…
  • LI Fishing Report
    The weather just does not want to let up this summer. The 4th of July saw some windy and sporty conditions. A week later tropical storm Elsa did a drive-by Long Island. Thankfully, it was a fast-moving weak storm by the time it hit us.…
  • Down At The Old Boatyard
    I’ve always been of the opinion that guys need two places to remain balanced: one is a place to be alone; the other is a place to be with other guys. In both cases, if possible, it’s best if it involves boats.The “alone” place is…
  • July 2021
  • They Who Go Down To The Sea – Capt. Joseph Darius Meade
    Not many of us have generations of family who have lived and worked on, and by the sea. Jed Meade is one of those lucky salts. Jed’s family history goes back to the age of sailing ships, and he lives in the house his grandfather,…
  • Tales from the Silent Service – USS Skipjack SSN-585
    USS Skipjack SSN-585 was the lead ship of her class of nuclear-powered attack submarines and the third ship of the United States Navy to be named after the skipjack, a streamlined, fast-swimming pelagic fish common in tropical waters throughout the world.Her keel was laid down…
  • Guy Lombardo’s Need For Speed
    Freeport Long Island was a frequent destination for my family. My father loved seafood and we ate at Barnacle Bills Seafood Restaurant often. It was on one of those dinner trips to Freeport, LI that my dad took me to see a fellow named Joe…
  • Getting Out On The Water, One Way or Another
    As Amazon changed our shopping habits with some help from the COVID restrictions, these same rules that kept us at home away from other people moved new boat sales into the fast lane. The lockdown problems affected the supply of new boats because boat building…
  • In Our Waters – Bound For New Orleans
    The macabre discovery in all of its horrifying nature was revealed because the top of the crate was unhinged and removed. The marbleized green-tinged skin of the corpse was clothed only in a shirt. The lifeless body’s neck was tightly bound to the knees with…
  • One Door Closes, Another Opens
    Or should I say, “solve one problem and another pops up”? Last month I wrote about installing a new turbocharger on our boat Keeper (Got Boost? LIBW June 2021).After taking care of some other items that needed attention, like a loose propeller, we launched Keeper…
  • Exit Three on the LI Sound, Oyster Bay
    Captains and families on the Long Island Sound do not have to go far for a fun weekend on their boat. Long Island’s north shore has six “exits” off the Long Island Sound that are worth a visit. These include three bays, two harbors and…
  • Skipper’s Corner – Let’s Go Faster, Even Faster!
    You love boats and want to be out on the water for a relaxing weekend, cruising with the family, rafting with friends, enjoying nature in a quiet cove, or hitting the fishing grounds. Some boaters are semi-pro boat racing enthusiasts and race in appropriate venues.…
  • Renaming A Boat
    The naming of a boat, even a very small boat, is a serious matter.-William Adkin I sell boats, new and used, so I don’t need our trade journals to tell me LOTS of you have bought new or a used boat recently and you’re wondering…
  • Let’s Take A Look at Her Bottom – Part II
    In last month’s installment, we discussed removing old bottom paint, repairing imperfections, and getting the vessel prepped for repainting. Time to paintThe paint should be shaken at the store and mixed again before use. When any paint sits for some time the components will separate…
  • Distress Signals Use and Identification
    It’s Easy As ABC and 123 * * * Previously we talked about the proper use of the ship’s radio for both standard communications and in emergency situations. However, emergencies can occur at times when neither radios nor cell phones can be used due to…
  • Seamanship – Hurricane Prep – The Boat
    Recently, NOAA issued an updated hurricane forecast, indicating a windy road ahead. After thinking about protecting yourself and your family, what about the boat? Tis the season of heavy weather. This column is about that. Let Me Say It Again…Never stay on the boat. I…
  • Can It Be A Fluke?
    Its nickname “chameleon of the sea” is well deserved. Seemingly gliding gracefully across the bottom with little effort, it can change its color from brown, gray green or even darker to blend with the pattern and color of the bottom on which it lands. To…
  • On Living Aboard
    When Patty O’, our 42 foot Huckins sedan cruiser came to us the first year or so was spent making her comfortable to live aboard. The work included updating some basics that don’t stand the test of time well. Things like fuel tanks, iceboxes, and,…
  • LI Fishing Report
    Blue fish, blue fish, and more bluefish. On both shores the rebounded stock of bluefish in 2021 has been a welcome site. Remember take only what you need and keep their return going! Striped bass are mixed in with decent numbers being caught. A good…
  • NJ Fishing Report
    Finally, a summer we can all enjoy once again! Take advantage of the lifting of Covid restrictions and utilize every moment to truly pursue your passions in the saltwater, being thankful we have the opportunity once again. Fishing is firing on all fronts. Some points…
  • Connecticut Fishing Report
    It is the middle of the summer, many people, at least those who don’t fish are golfing or home cooling off in front of an air conditioner, those that do are probably out on a boat or working the shoreline with their favorite rod and…
  • June 2021
  • One of the Worst Sea Disasters – That Wasn’t at Sea
    There have been many ship disasters in history accounting for large losses in lives. Most of us immediately think “Titanic – 1,128 victims, Lusitania-1,500 and the Andrea Doria – 69 (Including divers)”. All are assumed to have taken place on the ocean. They are documented…
  • Pioneer of the Modern Submarine Teardrop Hull – USS Albacore SSN-569
    USS Albacore AGSS-569 was a unique experimental submarine that pioneered the teardrop hull design also referred to as the “Albacore hull” of modern submarines. The innovative design was based on the “Lyon Shape” named for Hilda Lyon, a streamlined design originally used for airships. She…
  • Exit Two of the LI Sound
    Captains and families on the Long Island Sound do not have to go far for a fun weekend on their boat. Long Island’s North Shore has six “exits” off the Long Island Sound that are worth a visit. These include three bays, two harbors and…
  • How Is Commercial Fishing Surviving in New Jersey?
    The words from some of the fishermen, “Just barely.” The commercial fishermen and those in allied industries hope the return to near-normal this summer and the help they anticipate from the government will replenish supplies, bring back employees and bring back the market they’ve lost…
  • Swept Away in the Lower Bay
    In 1648, Peter Stuyvesant, the Dutch Director General of what would become the city of New York, ordered construction of the Manhattan’s first wharf; it was built on the East River. Entry into the harbor was tortuous, with its many bends and shallows. A fully…
  • Got Boost?
    No, I’m not talking about a dead battery, nor am I asking for a sip of your energy drink. I am talking about the boost pressure from the turbocharger that supplies the large amount of air engines need to make serious horsepower from a smaller…
  • Skipper’s Corner – Let the Professionals Do It!
    It’s been a beautiful spring and now everyone is hankering to get their boats in the water. Shrink is being removed and the boat yards are full of mechanics and support workers scurrying about trying to keep impatient bosses at bay while the boss has…
  • Seagull Savvy
    Seagull, seagull, sit on the sand; It’s never good weather when you’re on the land.-Old mariner’s weather proverbOspreys, egrets, herons, pelicans, cormorants, ducks and many other sorts of waterfowl wing about our coast, but there is no more common and dominant bird around the littoral…
  • Let’s Take A Look At the Bottom – Two-Part Series
    Maybe you have an older boat or you just purchased your dream boat during quarantine and you’re not confident regarding its history. During a boat’s life, if you haven’t hit submerged debris or bottomed out your either amazingly lucky, or you own a floating condo…
  • Legal Perspective – The Significance of the Release
    When a lawsuit is initiated, there’s often considerable paperwork that goes back and forth at the outset. This applies whether the matter involves a boating accident, breach of contract, or crew wage dispute. In the summons and complaint, facts of the case are outlined, legal…
  • Seamanship – Talking on Cell Phones – Part II
    Last month, we talked about cell phones aboard boats and the issues thereto. But they are fantastic devices – and therein lay another issue. As the functionality of cell phones starts to rival computers (did I say “rival” – I should have said “outpaces!”), we…
  • On Living Aboard
    Rain was falling when we got up Tuesday morning. Tomorrow would be one week since we dropped anchor about two miles inside Hamburg Cove and the fourth week since we left the yard. My wife, the Blonde did a few ‘work from home’ things and…
  • The Sailaway Gourmet
    We celebrated Memorial Day and here we are heading into full swing for our summer season. I hope we all get to spend a lot of time out on the water with our friends and family. Our summer picnics, BBQ’s, and gatherings on boats always…
  • NJ Fishing Report
    Last year at this time we had no reports due to the pandemic shutting most everything down from marinas to tackle shops to charter boats. Thankfully, it appears we have much more freedom and opportunity this June to get out and enjoy the outdoors. To…
  • CT Fishing Report
    When the northward migrating stripers are feeding on squid any “look alike”, anything from some deer tail hair on a chunk of lead to a sophisticated duplicate will draw strikes and catch fish. In deeper water hard-core striper anglers jig, troll deep or use fresh…
  • LI Fishing Report
    May started with a great deal of wind and rain. This made it difficult for anglers to get out and chase their favorite fish. But when Mother Nature allowed, those who made it out were not disappointed. Opening day fluke fishing saw some real good…
  • May 2021
  • Autonomous Ships
    Cars that drive themselves have been around for years. So it is a no brainer that boats would one day be driving themselves. In fact, they have been doing short trip across rivers and bays for quite a while. Unmanned underwater exploration vessels have been…
  • The Sharks Below Our Hulls and Feet!
    No, I don’t wanna’ be Quint and this is not about “JAWS”, It’s just an informative guide that answers the question that sunny day boaters and their guests often ask. Are there any sharks here? Knowing the person’s personality is my guide to gauge my…
  • The Boat I Didn’t Buy
    The old Huckins in the back of the used car lot had seen better days. Where repairs had been made they seemed to have been made by a person who had never been on a boat before. I did not expect a $4,500 boat that…
  • The Sea Islands of South Carolina
    My beautiful home state of South Carolina boasts 187 miles of Atlantic coastline renowned as the Lowcountry and Just off our sand beaches lays one of its most striking features, the Sea Islands; an extended string of twenty-five barrier islands that transform constantly with the…
  • Taking Exit One off the LI Sound
    Captains and families on the Long Island Sound do not have to go far for a fun weekend on their boat. Long Island’s north shore has six “exits” off the Long Island Sound that are worth a visit. These include three bays, two harbors and…
  • Admiral David G. Farragut – A Naval Hero Serving Our Country for Sixty Years
    David Glasgow Farragut, born July 5, 1801, is an important American hero who devoted his life to service in the United States Navy. He holds the distinction of the first man to be awarded the titles of rear admiral, vice admiral and full admiral of…
  • Skipper’s Corner – Learning the Ropes
    What type and size is best for your boat?The ropes you use while boating are never, ever called “Ropes”. They are always called “Lines”! Rope is the term for what is used to make boats lines but finished product is always called a “LINE” Your…
  • Sitting On the Dock of the Bay
    This is a little “out of area” and comes from a time I lived near the canal but it just might temp you to take a trip down to the C&D Canal, linking the Delaware Bay with the Chesapeake BayI find that three of the…
  • Sentinels and Saviors of the Sea – the Capture of the Revenue Cutter Caleb Cushing
    Each month, an interesting aspect of the world’s oldest continuous maritime service will be highlighted. The men and women of the United States Coast Guard follow in the fine tradition of the brave mariners who have served before them. As sentinels and saviors of the…
  • Seamanship – Hello? Hello? Can You Hear Me Now? – Cell Phones and Boats
    When I have written in the past about the need and use of a VHF radio, I noted that if you didn’t have a radio aboard that you were risking your life over a couple of hundred dollars – it was “nutty” not to have…
  • Advanced Navgation Rules – Part II
    Advanced Nav Rules, Part 2 of 3 … Inland and International Navigation Rules …The current Inland Navigation Rules were established in the1980’s. These were defined by the 1982 United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea. Inland Navigation Rules apply to waters that are…
  • Legal Perspective -Insurance Carrier Closely Examines Sinking at Dock
    The sinking of a boat can be an emotional and stressful event for an owner. But in the grand scheme of things within the recreational marine industry, it’s something that happens regularly… at a slip, at a mooring, or in a quiet patch of marshland…
  • On Living Aboard
    Although the boatyard is busy, we have managed to still remain isolated due to the COVID virus. We haven’t been inoculated as of yet. We’re not eligible because of our ages. That means whenever we venture off the boat, we are sure to be wearing…
  • The Sailaway Gourmet
    I am so thrilled to be back out on the water. I love the smells of the harbor, the way the air feels and being around so many happy people who enjoy getting out on a boat as much as I do. Let’s all have…
  • Celestial Navigation to GPS
    Even when boating close to shore, it can be difficult to relocate a favorite fishing or Scuba diving site, without a nearby marking buoy or some other point of orientation. Luckily, GPS and a good depth sounder has made it relatively easy to return to…
  • LI Fishing Report
    Freshwater fishing remained strong with yellow perch, bass, and pickerel. Pickerel reopened on May 1st. We also started to see more reports of trout becoming available as restocking programs are well underway. The main targets continue to be trout (brown and rainbow), white perch, and…
  • Pirate Soul
    It’s a rather interesting phenomenon that most of us think of pirates as romantic heroes, despite the fact they were common street criminals roaming the open seas. I have over a dozen coveted books about pirates and some of my favorite movies are the old…
  • CT Fishing Report
    This time of year nearly every species is on the move and feeding ravenously as they continue on their spring and summer migrations to feeding grounds in this region. To me, May is the beginning of the marine fishing season as warming waters on all…
  • NJ Fishing Report
    As Covid restrictions are being lifted by the week, it seems we are on track for a solid summer of fishing, and there‘s no finer kickoff than Memorial Day weekend in May to get it started. But before the holiday weekend, there’s plenty of prime…
  • April 2021
  • “Wrecking” On the Beaches
    For a century and a half, wreckers worked with impunity along Long Island’s South Shore beaches from Coney Island to Montauk Point. Men like Talmadge Smith and Thomas Jones lured ships onto the sand bars at night or found other vessels that ran aground and…
  • Tales From the Silent Service – My Story
    I’ve had a lifelong love for the United States Navy and the “The Silent Service” in particular, and serving there has been my proudest accomplishment. My patriotism for America is rooted in my childhood when mom would bring me to watch the parades on the…
  • Splashing Your Boat 2021
    Man, I’m soooo glad Spring 2021 is here, because 2020 was one helluva year. Without beating things to death, it will sure be nice to actually do any chores relating to boating (or honey-dos so you can do the chores related to boating) and get…
  • Women Boat Buyers
    Some in the marine industry were not surprised at the pent up demand for boats resulting from the pandemic lockdowns in many parts of the country in 2020. What seemed harder to grasp was the proportion of women in the surge toward boat ownership. Women…
  • A Striper: The Prized Catch
    By early April, autumn-bared trees have already begun to spread a new canopy along the banks of the Hudson River. As its waters warm to about 58 to 60 F, striped bass make their way upstream to spawn in the river’s freshwater. Stripers, rockfish, greenhead…
  • Consider the Crab
    I can unequivocally state that my favorite seafood, by far, is blue crab. I’ve always thought it quite logical that it required so much time and effort to extract the delicacy recessed inside such a formidable, almost alien-looking body. It looks more like some rare…
  • A Treasure Just Off the Island of Manhattan
    In the midst of skyscrapers reaching toward the clouds, people dodging each other on crowded sidewalks, wall-to-wall traffic and packed subways, the 172-acre island, a half-mile from the tip of Manhattan, provides visitors with peace and tranquility from a busy city. Standing at the mouth…